Hope Mills Road Animal Hospital

Hope Mills Road Animal Hospital

General Anesthesia/Surgery Discharge

Your pet has been through anesthesia &/or surgery. He/she will need special attention for a full, uneventful recovery, just as a human would. Please read and review the following instructions. If you have any questions at any time, please call.

Activity:  If discharged on the same day as anesthesia/surgery, prevent access to steps, climbing and jumping. If discharged on the same day as surgery and is an outdoor pet, your pet will need to be kept indoors overnight (and for the next 7-14 days if sutures/staples are present).

Diet: You can resume your pet's normal diet the day following surgery, but at a reduced amount. As long as he/she is able to keep food down and does not exhibit signs of illness, continue to increase the amount of food through the day. If discharged on the day of surgery, only offer small amounts of food and water after 8 pm. If your pet becomes sick to her stomach, discontinue food until the next morning.

Medications: Begin all medications the day of discharge unless otherwise directed. Directions for medications are printed on each bottle. Please observe recommendations for giving with food if stated.

Incision Care: No bathing or swimming for a minimum of 14 days after surgery. Please check the incision daily. Some redness and swelling is a normal consequence of surgery and healing. If the incision becomes painful,
opens or discharges pus or blood, please call the clinic for a re-check. A small amount of clear fluid may ooze from the incision and is considered normal. DO NOT allow your pet to lick, chew, rub or pull at the incision. If he/she does, you must stop the behavior right away and begin using an e-collar. If you do not have a collar at home, please pick one up from the clinic at your earliest ability. If sutures are present, suture removal is needed in 10 - 14 days. The exception to this is for declawing. Sutures for declaw procedures will disolve & fall out, usually within 4 - 6 weeks.

SURGICAL/ANESTHETIC COMPLICATIONS

ANESTHESIA AND INFECTION: All surgical procedures carry inherent risks. Among these are complications
associated with anesthesia and infection. We try to minimize potential problems by completing a thorough physical examination and doing bloodwork to make sure there are not significant underlying problems that would
necessitate putting off surgery or altering our anesthetic plan.

Most animals without underlying organ problems do well under anesthesia, but some animals do have problems that we cannot anticipate. Animals with significant metabolic or traumatic problems carry greater risks. These
problems can be as serious as death or as minor as prolonged recovery. Other problems include cough (from irritation from the tube in the throat or lung irritation) and intestinal problems (not eating very well or diarrhea). We closely monitor animals under anesthesia so that we can support them if there is a problem during the procedure. We routinely monitor the respiratory rate, heart rate and rhythm (EKG), and blood pressure. All
animals are on intravenous fluids to support their blood pressure.

Anytime an incision is made, infection is a potential complication. For most major surgical procedures we give intravenous antibiotic injections. Then, depending on the case, some animals will go home on oral antibiotics. It is important to observe the incision daily to make sure signs of an infection are not developing. Signs like swelling and drainage suggest infection.

ORTHOPEDIC (BONE, TENDON, LIGAMENT) SURGERY: Orthopedic operations that involve implants carry additional potential problems. Infections can have disastrous effects on orthopedic surgeries. Excessive stress or activity can lead to premature failure of the fixation. It is important to minimize activity during the healing period to minimize stress on the implants and to allow healing before implant failure. Individual implants can fail or the entire construct can fail. If the bone (or tendon or ligament) does not heal as it should in a timely fashion, the
implant supporting the tissue WILL eventually fail. And again, minimizing activity allows tissues to heal as rapidly as possible.

Suture Care

For the next 10 to 14 days, your pet will have skin sutures at the surgery site. We request that you do not bathe your pet while the sutures remain in the skin. Additionally, all exercise should be kept at a minimum.

These sutures will need to be removed. We ask that you call us to schedule an appointment several days in advance to have the sutures removed. Generally, there is no charge for removing the sutures.

If swelling, excessive reddening, licking, or other signs of infection occur, or if you have any questions on your pet's condition, please contact us.

Cat Neuter Discharge

 Your pet has been through a major surgery. He will need special attention for a full, uneventful recovery, just as a human would. Please read and review the following instructions. If you have any questions at any time, please call.

Activity: No bathing for a minimum of 14 days after surgery. If discharged on the same day as surgery, prevent access to steps, climbing and jumping. If discharged on the same day as surgery and is an outdoor cat, your pet will need to be kept indoors overnight and for the next 7-10 days.

Diet: You can resume your pet's normal diet the day following surgery, but at a reduced amount. As long as he is able to keep food in and doesn't exhibit signs of illness, continue to increase the amount of food through the day. If discharged on the day of surgery, only offer small amounts of food and water after 8 pm. If your pet becomes sick to his stomach, discontinue food until the next morning.

 Medications: Begin all medications the day of discharge unless otherwise directed. Directions for medications are printed on each bottle. Please observe recommendations for giving with food if stated.

Incision Care: Please check the incisions daily. Some redness and swelling is a normal consequence of surgery and healing. If the incision becomes painful, opens or discharges pus or blood, please call the clinic for a re-check. A small amount of clear fluid may ooze from the incision and is considered normal. DO NOT allow your pet to lick, chew, rub or pull at the incisions. If he does, you must stop the behavior right away and begin using the e-collar you were sent home with. If you do not have a collar at home, please pick one up from the clinic at the earliest ability. There are no sutures to remove.

 

Cat Neuter/Declaw Discharge

Your pet has been through a major surgery. He will need special attention for a full, uneventful recovery, just as a human would. Please read and review the following instructions. If you have any questions at any time, please call.

Activity: No bathing for a minimum of 14 days after surgery. Please keep running and jumping to a minimum for 14 days. After a declaw, jumping up is easy, but landing on the front feet is very painful. Because your pet was declawed, we assume he will be an indoor cat and should remain so, especially for 14 days to heal after surgery.

Diet: You can resume you cat's normal diet the day following surgery, but at a reduced amount. As long as he is able to keep food down and doesn't exhibit signs of illness, continue to increase the amount of food through the day.

Medications: Directions for medications are printed on each bottle. Please observe recommendations for giving with food if stated.

Incision Care: Please check the incision daily. Some redness and swelling is a normal consequence of surgery and healing. If the incision becomes painful, opens or discharges pus or blood, please call the clinic for a re-check. A small amount of clear fluid may ooze from the incision and is considered normal. DO NOT allow you cat to lick, chew, rub or pull at the incision. If he does, you must stop the behavior right away and begin using the e-collar you were sent home with. Or, if you do not have a collar at home, please pick one up from the clinic at your earliest ability. Your cat may want to lick his paws and tug on the surgical glue or sutures. This behavior is acceptable as long as the incisions remain closed and clean. You will need to switch the litter for 7-14 days from what you were using to a product such as Yesterday's news, "crystal" litter or shredded paper. There are no sutures for the neuter incision. Any sutures used in the paws will dissolve on their own.

 

Cat Spay Discharge

Your cat has been through a major abdominal surgery. She will need special attention for a full, uneventful recovery, just as a human would. Please read and review the following instructions. If you have any questions at any time, please call.

Activity: No bathing for a minimum of 14 days after surgery. If discharged on the same day as surgery, prevent access to steps, climbing and jumping. If discharged on the same day as surgery and is an outdoor cat, your cat will need to be kept indoors overnight and for the next 7-14 days.

Diet: You can resume your cat's normal diet the day following surgery, but at a reduced amount. As long as she is able to keep food down and doesn't exhibit signs of illness, continue to increase the amount of food through the day. If discharged on the day of surgery, only offer small amounts of food and water after 8 pm. If your cat becomes sick to her stomach, discontinue food until the next morning.

Medications: Begin all medications the day of discharge unless otherwise directed. Directions for medications are printed on each bottle. Please observe recommendations for giving with food if stated.

Incision Care: Please check the incision daily. Some redness and swelling is a normal consequence of surgery and healing. If the incision becomes painful, opens or discharges pus or blood, please call the clinic for a re-check. A small amount of clear fluid may ooze from the incision and is considered normal. DO NOT allow your cat to lick, chew, rub or pull at the incision. If she does, you must stop the behavior right away and begin using the e-collar you were sent home with. If you do not have a collar at home, please pick one up from the clinic at your earliest ability. Suture removal is needed in 10 - 14 days.

 

Cat Spay/Declaw Discharge

Your cat has been through a major abdominal surgery. She will need special attention for a full, uneventful recovery, just as a human would. Please read and review the following instructions. If you have any questions at any time, please call.

Activity: No bathing for a minimum of 14 days after surgery. Please keep running and jumping to a minimum for 14 days. After a declaw, jumping up is easy, but landing on the front feet is very painful. Because your cat was declawed, we assume she will be an indoor cat and should remain so, especially for 14 days to heal after surgery.

Diet: You can resume your cat's normal diet the day following surgery, but at a reduced amount. As long as she is able to keep food in and doesn't exhibit signs of illness, continue to increase the amount of food through the day.

Medications: Begin all medications the day of discharge unless otherwise directed. Directions for medications are printed on each bottle. Please observe recommendations for giving with food if stated.

Incision Care: Please check the incision daily. Some redness and swelling is a normal consequence of surgery and healing. If the incision becomes painful, opens or discharges pus or blood, please call the clinic for a re-check. A small amount of clear fluid may ooze from the incision and is considered normal. DO NOT allow your cat to lick, chew, rub or pull at the incision. If she does, you must stop the behavior right away and begin using the e-collar you were sent home with. Or, if you do not have a collar at home, please pick one up from the clinic at your earliest ability. Your cat may want to lick her paws and tug on the surgical glue and/or sutures. This behavior is acceptable as long as the incision remain closed and clean. You will need to switch the litter for 7-14 days from what you were using to a product such as Yesterday's news, crystal litter, or shredded paper. Suture removal is needed from spay incision in 10 - 14 day. Any sutures in the paws will dissolve on their own.

 

Declaw Only Discharge

Your cat has been through a major surgery. He/she will need special attention for a full, uneventful recovery, just as a human would. Please read and review the following instructions. If you have any questions at any time, please call.

Activity: No bathing for a minimum of 14 days after surgery. Please keep running and jumping to a minimum for 14 days. After a declaw, jumping up is easy, but landing on the front feet is very painful. Because your cat was declawed, we assume he/she will be an indoor cat and should remain so, especially for 14 days to heal after surgery.

Diet: You can resume your cat's normal diet the day following surgery, but at a reduced amount. As long as he/she is able to keep food down and doesn't exhibit signs of illness, continue to increase the amount of food through the day.

Medications: Directions for medications are printed on each bottle. Please observe recommendations for giving with food if stated.

Incision Care: Please check the incision daily. Some redness and swelling is a normal consequence of surgery and healing. If the incision becomes painful, opens or discharges pus or blood, please call the clinic for a re-check. A small amount of clear fluid may ooze from the incision and is considered normal. your cat may want to lick his/her paws and tug on the surgical glue. This behavior is acceptable as long as the incision remains closed and clean. You will need to switch the litter for 7-14 days from what you were using to a product such as shredded paper, Yesterday's News, or "crystal" litter. Any sutures present will dissolve on their own or be removed by your cat over time.

 

Dog Neuter Discharge

Your dog has been through a major surgery. He will need special attention for a full, uneventful recovery, just as a human would. Please read and review the following instructions. If you have any questions at any time, please call.

Activity: No free running (must be on leash) or jumping for a minimum of 5 days, including outside time for going to the bathroom. No bathing or swimming for a minimum of 14 days after surgery. If discharged on the same day as surgery, prevent access to steps and climbing. If discharged on the same day as surgery and is an outdoor dog, your dog will need to be kept indoors overnight.

Diet: You can resume your dog's normal diet the day following surgery, but at a reduced amount. As long as he is able to keep food in and doesn't exhibit signs of illness, continue to increase the amount of food through the day. If discharged on the day of surgery, only offer small amounts of food and water after 8 pm. If yoru dog becomes sick to his stomach, discontinue food until the next morning.

Medications: Begin all medications the day of discharge unless otherwise directed. Directions for medications are printed on each bottle. Please observe recommendations for giving with food if stated.

Incision Care: Please check the incision daily. Some redness and swelling is a normal consequence of surgery and healing. If the incision becomes painful, opens or discharges pus or blood, please call the clinic for a re-check. A small amount of clear fluid may ooze from the incision and is considered normal. DO NOT allow your dog to lick, chew, rub or pull at the incision. If he does, you must stop the behavior right away and begin using the e-collar you were sent home with. If you do not have a collar at home, please pick one up from the clinic at the earliest ability. There are no sutures to remove.

 

Dog Spay Discharge

Your dog has been through a major abdominal surgery. She will need special attention for a full, uneventful recovery, just as a human would. Please read and review the following instructions. If you have any questions at any time, please call.

Activity: No bathing for a minimum of 14 days after surgery. If discharged on the same day as surgery, prevent access to steps, climbing and jumping. If discharged on the same day as surgery and is an outdoor dog, your dog will need to be kept indoors overnight and for the next 7-14 days.

Diet: You can resume yoru dog's normal diet the day following surgery, but at a reduced amount. As long as she is able to keep food down and doesn't exhibit signs of illness, continue to increase the amount of food through the day. If discharged on the day of surgery, only offer small amounts of food and water after 8 pm. If your dog becomes sick to her stomach, discontinue food until the next morning.

Medications: Directions for medications are printed on each bottle. Please observe recommendations for giving with food if stated.

Incision Care: Please check the incision daily. Some redness and swelling is a normal consequence of surgery and healing. If the incision becomes painful, opens or discharges pus or blood, please call the clinic for a re-check. A small amount of clear fluid may ooze from the incision and is considered normal. DO NOT allow your dog to lick, chew, rub or pull at the incision. If she does, you must stop the behavior right away and begin using the e-collar you were sent home with. If you do not have a collar at home, please pick one up from the clinic at your earliest ability. Suture removal is needed in 10 - 14 days.

 

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